Join Today
Thanks Thanks:  1
Likes Likes:  1
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: trailer?

  1. #1
    Super Moderator MJC's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Mid Hudson Valley, 60 miles N of NYC
    Posts
    438

    trailer?

    I just got a motorcycle trailer, there is a front wheel holder (wheel chock). I have a ctx700 full faring dct. So I was thinking if I installed a center stand on the bike, could I load the bike with the front wheel in the wheel chock, strap the front wheel to the wheel chock, then put the bike on the center stand and then strap the center stand down?

    Or just strape the front wheel in the holder, use the side stand and just strap the bike down. This is the way I have done it before. This way is harder for me to get the bike sitting level, placing the straps and getting it set up.

    My thinking using the center stand, I would just lock down the stand, not strap the bike, just the center stand would be a lot less pressure on the bike. And a lot less pressure on me haveing the front wheel chock and center stand hold the bike level and then straping the front tire into the wheel chock and then straping the center stand down.

    So what do you think? How do people load, strap down a bike with a center stand?

    thanks for any help, mj
    Last edited by MJC; 03-21-2018 at 06:58 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member BobWitte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Hudson, FL (40 miles NW of Tampa)
    Posts
    118
    Quote Originally Posted by MJC View Post
    I just got a motorcycle trailer, there is a front wheel holder (wheel chock). I have a ctx700 full faring dct. So I was thinking if I installed a center stand on the bike, could I load the bike with the front wheel in the wheel chock, strap the front wheel to the wheel chock, then put the bike on the center stand and then strap the center stand down?

    Or just strape the front wheel in the holder, use the side stand and just strap the bike down. This is the way I have done it before. This way is harder for me to get the bike sitting level, placing the straps and getting it set up.

    My thinking using the center stand, I would just lock down the stand, not strap the bike, just the center stand would be a lot less pressure on the bike. And a lot less pressure on me haveing the front wheel chock and center stand hold the bike level and then straping the front tire into the wheel chock and then straping the center stand down.

    So what do you think? How do people load, strap down a bike with a center stand?

    thanks for any help, mj
    In cases such as this, YOUTUBE.COM is your friend. Sign in and search "strapping down a motorcycle" and you'll get plenty of short videos to guide you. Pictures are more useful for this procedure than written words.
    Former rides: 1955 Triumph 150cc Tiger Cub; 1959 98cc Moto Parilla; 1948 Harley 80ci FL police model; 1964 Honda 250cc CB72; 1991 1200cc Sportster trike; 2006 Hyosung GV650 trike; 1982 Honda SilverWing GL500i trike
    Currently: 2014 Honda CTX700 trike

  3. #3
    Senior Member ponydrvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY, USA
    Posts
    167
    FWIW: I have traileed many bikes for many folks of many different styles.

    First, the front wheel chock is a greast idea. BUT, strap the bike securely to the trailer frame. DO NOT use a product called "Canyon Dancer" but use the lower triple tree crossmember compressing the front suspension about 50% and pressuring the front tire into the chock. The chock MUST be securely mounted to the bed of the trailer and placed so that the balance puts ~60% of the weight forward of the trailer axle.

    Second, DO NOT USE THE CENTER STAND! Use the rear frame tiedown points to secure the rear of the bike to the trailer. These should also compress the rear suspension ~50%. Do not tie the rear wheel. Ensure the bike is setting vertical or adjust tension on the tiedown straps one side or the other to correct.

    This method will allow the bike to absorb road surface issues without punching holes in the flooring or bending the bike frame.

  4. Thanks kujawskir thanked for this post
    Likes kujawskir liked this post
  5. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    St Petersburg fl.
    Posts
    56
    Ditto on Bobs YouTube suggestion, I think it is a goldmine of information on just about anything you can think of including successes and failures. I don’t think if you strap the tire to the chock first it will go up on the stand. I put my foot on the center stand, grab the passenger peg and pull up and a back and it goes right up on the stand but it also moves backwards a little. With out the ability for the front wheel to move back a little you may not be able to rotate the stand up under it. I trailered a KLR 650 on a Harbor Freight folding trailer without a wheel chock without any issues. I used two ratchet straps on the handle bars due to the bike being so tall and top heavy and just chinched it down enough to compress the forks a little bit and two cinch straps in the rear. I then used four more cinch straps as cheap insurance to back up the others. No matter where you put the straps I would invest in a set of soft strap covers to protect the bikes finish. The smallest amount of strap movement creates friction and wear.

    https://www.denniskirk.com/407790.sk...d=244288899357
    CTX700ND DCT/ABS

  6. #5
    Super Moderator MJC's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Mid Hudson Valley, 60 miles N of NYC
    Posts
    438
    Thanks guys, I did check YouTube, now I know why there are no, using the centerstand, youtubes.

    My trailer has the Condor front wheel chock, then you ride your bike into it, it locks the wheel/tire in. You then strap the front end down. I just wanted to know about straping the rear down. Now I know to not use the center stand, just go with the reg two strapes off the rear.

    Thanks again, mjc

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •